Fly control season is here and we have your solutions!

TIME TO THINK ABOUT FLY CONTROL

Written by Carter Jensen, Livestock Nutrition Advisor

Why Use Fly Control

Many producers may be wondering, “Why should I use fly control?” The simple answer is, to raise healthier animals with a better rate of gain. Did you know that the number one pest threat on pastures is flies? A study at the University of Oklahoma State found that cattle-fed fly control saw a 15.8% increase in average daily gain. Another study conducted by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln found that cows fed fly control raised calves that were 10-20 pounds heavier at weaning than that of the control group. One reason for this is the decreased amount of tail swatting which both burns calories and distracts the animals from eating.

How They Work

Warmer weather means the start of fly season. One simple and effective solution to control fly populations is using a feed-through larvicide, such as ClariFly or Altosid. These products are insect growth regulators (IGR), which work through the animal’s manure where flies lay their eggs. The result is eventually stopping the fly life cycle, preventing the larvae from molting into pupae. Another feed additive that can be used to help detract flies is garlic. Studies on garlic are limited but some have shown cows that are fed garlic through grazing have significantly lower fly loads.

 

When to Feed

So, you may be asking when and how long you will need to feed an additive for fly control. Ideally, a producer would begin to use some type of fly control 30 days before flies appear and for it to be fed 30 days after the first frost. However, this does not mean that it is too late to start using a feed additive for fly control. The products still work, as designed regardless of when you start. One thing to remember when starting late is it takes time for these products to work through the cycle and realize fly decrease. As a reminder, these products will not eliminate flies, but they will decrease the fly load. If you have questions about fly control, please reach out to our team of Livestock Nutrition Advisors!

ONE-STOP SHOP

CPM is your one-stop shop for everything in the Livestock Show business. Quinton and Kyle are ready to go and excited to help you! Reach out today. We are here to answer any questions you may have!

NEBRASKA BISON

Travis, and Intern, Alexis Wegener visited Nebraska Bison recently!

HAPPY MEMORIAL DAY

Memorial weekend is upon us and we want to take a moment to say thank you to all who have served and for those who have given their life in service to our great country. We thank you and your families for giving the ultimate sacrifice.

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We employ a diversified package of techniques to master the art of feed manufacturing from minerals to complete feeds. We provide an in-depth record system and feed sampling to back up our process and quality control points.

Fly Control

Fly Control by CPM

Why use fly control?

Many producers may be wondering, “Why should I use fly control?” The simple answer is, to raise healthier animals with a better rate of gain. Did you know that the number one pest threat on pastures is flies? A study at the University of Oklahoma State found that cattle fed fly control saw a 15.8% increase in average daily gain. Another study conducted by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, found that the cows raised calves that were 10-20 pounds heavier at weaning than that of the control group. One reason for this is the decreased amount of tail swatting which both burns calories and distracts the animals from eating.

How It Works

Warmer weather means the start of fly season. One simple and effective solution to control fly populations is using a feed-through larvicide, such as ClariFly or Altosid. These products are insect growth regulators (IGR), which work through the animal’s manure where flies lay their eggs. The result is eventually stopping the fly life cycle, preventing the larvae from molting into pupae. Another feed additive that can be used to help detract flies is garlic. Studies on garlic are limited but some have shown cows that are fed garlic through grazing have significantly lower fly loads.

When To Feed

So, you may be asking when and how long do I need to feed an additive for fly control? Ideally a producer would begin to use some type of fly control 30 days prior to flies appearing and for it to be fed 30 days after the first frost. However, this does not mean that it is too late to start using a feed additive. The products still work, as designed regardless of when you start. One thing to remember when starting late, is it takes time for these products to work through the cycle and realize fly decrease. As a reminder, these products will not eliminate flies entirely, but they will decrease the fly load. If you have questions about fly control, please reach out to our team of Livestock Nutrition Advisors!

by Carter Jensen, Livestock Nutrition Advisor

Spring in Full Swing

SPRING & AVOIDING GRASS TETANY

Written by Carly Steffensmeier, Livestock Nutrition Advisor

Springtime is here! The grass gets greener, and producers are excited to get their cows out on pasture, but as a producer, did you properly prepare your cows for that lush green grass? Death from grass tetany can occur very rapidly. Luckily, there is an inexpensive “insurance policy” to help prevent it. Magnesium!

GRASS TETANY CAUSES

Grass tetany occurs when magnesium becomes deficient in the cow. Grass is high in potassium, nitrogen, calcium, and phosphorus. When a cow starts consuming lush grass, high in these nutrients, it interferes with magnesium absorption. Lactating cows also require an increased amount of magnesium. These factors during the spring, increase the risk for grass tetany in your herd.

HOW TO PREVENT?

Prevention starts with feeding a high magnesium mineral or mixing magnesium by hand into your mineral for three weeks before turnout and continues until grass matures (usually about three weeks after turnout). The University of Nebraska-Lincoln recommends feeding about 10 to 20 grams of magnesium per day.

Prevention is the best method to manage grass tetany. Contact your CPM nutrition advisor for more information and to get set up with magnesium before you send your herd to those green, lush pastures.

CONGRATULATONS

Congratulations, Carter! Carter Jensen received an Above and Beyond award today for service to his Frontier and CPM team. Carter is motivated by supporting his team and his customers. We are proud to have him on the Frontier CPM team!

NUTRITION TIP

If you have less than quality hay, or hay that your cows won’t eat. Pouring your bales with Frontiers QLF is a great way to make them gobble it up! For more information, reach out to your CPM Livestock Nutrition Advisor!

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We employ a diversified package of techniques to master the art of feed manufacturing from minerals to complete feeds. We provide an in-depth record system and feed sampling to back up our process and quality control points.

The Role of Brown Fat in Calves’ Survival

The unforgiving world of cold and wet weather, the survival and vulnerability in newborn calves prompts a critical question. Why do some endure the rigors while others succumb to hypothermia in identical conditions? Delving into this enigma is an enlightening article titled “Brown Fat Ensures Survival in Calves,” featured on AG Proud. This insightful piece explores the indispensable role of brown fat, also known as brown adipose tissue (BAT), in shaping the fate of newborn calves.

The Guardian Effect of Good Mothers

While good mothering undoubtedly plays a pivotal role in calf survival, the research spotlighted in this article unveils an additional layer to the story. It unveils that, beyond the watchful eyes of nurturing mothers, the survival of calves in harsh weather conditions hinges on the presence and functionality of brown fat. The nurturing warmth provided by motherly care is complemented by the intrinsic ability of brown fat to generate body heat through non-shivering thermogenesis.

Brown Fat’s Unique Functionality

Brown fat’s unique function lies in its capacity for non-shivering thermogenesis, a process that generates body heat without the characteristic shivering response. This becomes particularly crucial for newborn calves navigating cold and wet conditions, where the ability to maintain internal warmth is a life-saving imperative. As the article on AG Proud details, brown fat emerges as a biological hero, ensuring the survival of calves by actively contributing to their thermoregulation in challenging weather scenarios.

Featuring “Brown Fat Ensures Survival in Calves” on Central Plains Milling

Central Plains Milling is excited to feature this illuminating article on our website, recognizing its significance in the broader context of calf rearing. Understanding the pivotal role of brown fat opens avenues for enhanced care and management practices, enabling producers to better support the resilience and survival of their calves in adverse weather conditions. Join us as we delve into the nuances of brown fat’s contribution to calf survival, offering practical insights and applications for cattle producers seeking to optimize their operations.

Stay tuned for more in-depth explorations into the intricate dynamics of cattle health and well-being, brought to you by Central Plains Milling.

Exploring the Vital Link between Nutrition and Reproduction in Beef Cattle

In the expansive realm of beef cattle production, the quest for optimizing reproductive success pivots on a complex interplay between nutrition and reproductive traits. At the forefront of this exploration is a seminal research article titled “Nutrition and Reproduction Interactions,” authored by Rick Funston from the University of Nebraska’s West Central Research and Extension Center in North Platte. This article delves into the nuanced relationship between the environment, nutritional requirements, and reproductive outcomes in beef females.

Read Full Article: “Nutrition and Reproduction Interactions,” authored by Rick Funston from the University of Nebraska’s West Central Research and Extension Center in North Platte.

The Complexity of Reproductive Traits

Traditional measurements of direct reproductive traits often reveal low heritability, challenging the conventional understanding of genetic influence on reproductive success. Funston’s research accentuates the role of the production environment as a pivotal determinant of reproductive outcomes. This perspective shifts the focus from solely genetic factors to the broader impact of the environment in shaping the reproductive landscape of beef cattle.

The Energy Equation

A central focus of Funston’s work is the impact of cow size and milk production on the energy and protein needs of beef cattle, even during non-lactating periods. Large cow size and heightened milk production translate into increased nutrient requirements, a crucial consideration for sustaining reproductive efficiency. This heightened demand for nutrients poses a significant challenge, potentially limiting the carrying capacity of farms and ranches and necessitating a meticulous approach to nutritional management.

Navigating the Balance between Nutrition and Reproduction

The heart of the matter lies in aligning a cow’s nutrient requirements with the available feed resources. Failure to achieve this delicate equilibrium can compromise reproductive outcomes, leading to inefficiencies in beef cattle production. As we explore Funston’s findings, it becomes apparent that a comprehensive understanding of the intricate balance between nutrition and reproduction is imperative for cattle producers seeking to enhance the efficiency of their operations.

Central Plains Milling’s Perspective

Central Plains Milling recognizes the pivotal insights offered by Funston’s research and aims to illuminate its implications for cattle producers. In forthcoming articles, we will delve into the practical applications of these findings, offering actionable strategies for nutrition management that can positively impact the reproductive success of beef cattle. Stay tuned as we unravel the dynamics of nutrition and reproduction, unlocking the secrets embedded in the intricate tapestry of beef cattle production.

Traditional measurements of direct reproductive traits often reveal low heritability, emphasizing the paramount role of the production environment in shaping reproductive success. Funston’s research highlights the significance of cow size and milk production in dictating heightened energy and protein needs, even during non-lactating periods. This elevated demand for nutrients poses a critical challenge, potentially limiting the carrying capacity of farms and ranches.

In essence, the crux of the matter lies in aligning a cow’s nutrient requirements with the available feed resources. Failure to achieve this delicate balance can compromise reproductive outcomes, emphasizing the need for a meticulous approach to nutritional management in beef cattle operations.

Central Plains Milling recognizes the pivotal insights offered by this research and aims to shed light on its implications for cattle producers. As we delve into the details of Funston’s findings, we uncover valuable information that can reshape approaches to nutrition management, ultimately enhancing the reproductive efficiency of beef cattle. Stay tuned as we explore the intersection of nutrition and reproduction, unraveling the secrets that lie within the intricate tapestry of beef cattle production.

Omega 3 Fatty Acids in Ranching

Breeding season is fast approaching, and for cow-calf producers, it stands out as a crucial period in their operations. While calving time is often considered significant, the essence lies in successful breeding. In this article, we’ll delve into the pivotal advantages of incorporating omega 3 fatty acids into your ranching practices and explore how it can positively influence embryo viability and overall reproductive success.

The Impact of Omega 3 Fatty Acids on Reproductive Health

Cows and Healthy Calfs after implementing Omega Fatty Acids.

1. Understanding Omega 3 and Omega 6 Fatty Acids

Most of the feedstuffs commonly used in ranching are high in omega 6 fatty acids. Unfortunately, these omega 6s contribute to inflammation, directly affecting the attachment of fertilized eggs to the uterine wall. Additionally, they play a critical role in the production of prostaglandin, which, when elevated, can lead to abortions. On the other hand, omega 3 fatty acids act as anti-inflammatories, reducing inflammation and aiding in the production of estrogen while decreasing prostaglandin levels.

2. Impact on Embryo Viability

Research, including data from Colorado State University (CSU), suggests that 40% of open cows and heifers were initially bred but, due to unknown stress, experienced pregnancy loss within the first 42 days. Feeding omega 3 fatty acids helps suppress prostaglandin production, positively impacting embryo viability and maintenance. In dairy cattle, studies have shown a remarkable 15% increase in overall conception rates.

3. Practical Recommendations for Omega 3 Supplementation

Investing in replacement heifers is substantial, and returns are not realized until the animal is at least two and a half years old. To ensure the optimal reproductive health of your herd, consider feeding omega mineral at least 30 days before artificial insemination (AI) or turning out the bulls until 45 days post-breeding. For bulls, a minimum of 60 days of omega mineral supplementation is recommended to positively impact sperm production, enhancing both motility and volume on semen tests.

The Importance of Early Pregnancy Days

1. Critical Period of the First 42 Days

Extensive research indicates that the first 42 days of pregnancy are the most critical, influencing embryo attachment and maintenance. Feeding omega 3s during this period reduces inflammation of the reproductive tract and promotes the elongation of the initial attachment of the embryo, significantly improving embryo viability.

2. Positive Outcomes and Adoption

Producers incorporating the omega 3 program on their heifers have reported reduced third-cycle pregnancies and open cows. This approach not only benefits purebred operations focused on genetics but also proves that, in calf sales at weaning or as 8 weights, age often outperforms genetics.

Conclusion

As the breeding season approaches, consider the impact of omega 3 fatty acids on your ranching operation. For more information or to implement CPM’s omega 3 mineral in your feeding program, reach out to your CPM Nutrition Advisor today.

Bob Myers

Livestock Consultant

308-367-7115

Happy Holidays!

HAPPY HOLIDAYS

Happy Holidays to you and your families! Thank you for the opportunity to serve you in 2023 and we look forward to working with you in the coming New Year.

CALVING SEASON & MINERALS

by Bob Myers, Livestock Consultant

Calving season is upon us, and it’s crucial to discuss the significance of our Calving and Breeding mineral. In this discussion, we’ll explore the advantages that set our mineral apart from others in the market and understand how it works within the animal to achieve optimal results.

ADDRESSING SCOURS WITH MOS MINERAL

One of the primary health concerns for producers is scours, which remains a persistent challenge despite various preventive measures. In the past two decades, many producers have integrated MOS minerals into their operations to control scour outbreaks. Drawing from personal experience as an early adopter of MOS in bovine applications, we delve into its mode of action. MOS, a non-nutritive component of yeast cell walls, specifically targets E. coli and Salmonella bacteria in the gut, providing a crucial defense against these harmful pathogens.

HOW MOS WORKS IN THE GUT

Understanding the mechanics of MOS is essential for effective implementation. E. coli and Salmonella bacteria, attracted to carbohydrates, pose a threat to nursing calves. MOS mimics carbohydrates, attracting and trapping these bacteria, which are then safely expelled from the calf’s system. Additionally, MOS aids in reducing the incidence of C & D toxoids, contributing to a healthier gut and minimizing the risk of ulcers.

GRACE, GRATITUDE & GRIT

Janessa, Carly, and Tonya Dodds with Dodds Cattle spent the day at the AgCeptional Women’s Conference: “Grace, Gratitude, Grit” recently! It was a great day spent with fellow women in the Agricultural industry.

CATTLEMEN'S MEETING

We appreciate being part of the Butler County Cattlemen’s meeting in Bellwood on Monday night! Cory was asked to talk to the group about Central Plains Milling and Frontier Cooperative’s Animal Nutrition team and what they have to offer. Carter also gave a presentation on supplementing cows while grazing winter cornstalks.

CONGRATULATIONS

We would like to congratulate Braysen Miller on his success at the Cardinal Classic Cattle Show this past weekend! Braysen had the 5th overall with his Charolais heifer. Braysen and his family use our CPM Showcalf Creep w/Precon for his show heifers, along with Cattle Volumizer from Cooper Specialty Feeds. Ask any of our advisors about these products for your show heifer projects!

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We employ a diversified package of techniques to master the art of feed manufacturing from minerals to complete feeds. We provide an in-depth record system and feed sampling to back up our process and quality control points.

Calving Season and Mineral Importance

Calving season is upon us, and it’s crucial to discuss the significance of our Calving and Breeding mineral. In this discussion, we’ll explore the advantages that set our mineral apart from others in the market and understand how it works within the animal to achieve optimal results.

Addressing Scours with MOS Mineral

One of the primary health concerns for producers is scours, which remains a persistent challenge despite various preventive measures. In the past two decades, many producers have integrated MOS mineral into their operations to control scour outbreaks. Drawing from personal experience as an early adopter of MOS in bovine applications, we delve into its mode of action. MOS, a non-nutritive component of yeast cell walls, specifically targets E. coli and Salmonella bacteria in the gut, providing a crucial defense against these harmful pathogens.

How MOS Works in the Gut

Understanding the mechanics of MOS is essential for effective implementation. E. coli and Salmonella bacteria, attracted to carbohydrates, pose a threat to nursing calves. MOS mimics carbohydrates, attracting and trapping these bacteria, which are then safely expelled from the calf’s system. Additionally, MOS aids in reducing the incidence of C & D toxoid, contributing to a healthier gut and minimizing the risk of ulcers.

Feeding Protocol for CPM Calving and Breeding Mineral

The most effective feeding protocol for our mineral involves starting at least 30 days before calving. University of Kentucky trial data supports the benefits, showing a 30% increase in IGG levels in colostrum and a prolonged duration of passive immunity in calves. By incorporating MOS into the cow’s diet, we extend the window of passive immunity, offering crucial protection during the vulnerable early days of a calf’s life.

Unique Formulation and Benefits of CPM Mineral

CPM Calving and Breeding mineral stands out due to its unique formulation, incorporating Diamond V yeast, a rich source of mannanoligosaccharides (MOS) and beta-glucans. This formulation is specifically designed to encourage intake in young calves, jumpstarting their active immunity at an early age. The mineral aids in the recovery of the cow, ensuring she returns to breeding condition promptly.

Importance of Pre-Calving Nutrition

The success of our mineral program underscores the importance of pre-calving nutrition. It adheres to guidelines developed over 25 years to ensure consistent intakes in calves without compromising reproductive performance in cows. It is recommended to collaborate with Nutrition Advisors to tailor a mineral program that suits individual needs and operations.

Bob Myers

Livestock consultant

308-367-7115

Happy Thanksgiving!

HAPPY THANKSGIVING

We’d like to wish everyone a very Happy Thanksgiving holiday and say thank you to all of our customers who have chosen us to feed greatness!

USING STRESS TUBS?

Are your calves stressed during weaning, receiving into the feedlot, or because of a change in the weather? Purina Stress Tubs can help with this. Carly can tell you first-hand, that her customers have been very happy with their calves utilizing these stress tubs. Ask her about them today or one of our Livestock Nutrition Advisors.

FEED SAMPLES

Recently, we’ve had great weather for pulling feed samples for customers. If you have questions or need help with a ration, please reach out to one of our amazing Livestock Nutrition Advisors. We will be more than happy to help you succeed!

FOLLOW US ON:
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We employ a diversified package of techniques to master the art of feed manufacturing from minerals to complete feeds. We provide an in-depth record system and feed sampling to back up our process and quality control points.

Grazing Corn Stalks

Harvest is here and most producers are itching to move cows to corn stalks! Having access to corn stalks is a great opportunity to provide a relatively inexpensive feed for your herd. Before you turn out on stalks, there are many questions to consider. What should I feed them before turnout? What do I do if there is a lot of corn on the ground? What protein supplementation will I provide? CPM is here to help answer your questions!

Grazing Corn Stalks

Before turnout, we recommend making sure your cows are full on dry hay, then turning them out midday. In fields with a lot of corn on the ground, you can acclimate your cows by feeding grain 3-4 days prior to prepare them for the corn they will indulge on. We also highly recommend putting out free choice Sodium Bicarbonate. This is a very cost-effective way to buffer the rumen against the high pH levels your herd may experience. As for protein supplementation, there are a variety of options. You can utilize DDG cubes, different forms of distiller grains, or protein tubs. Protein supplementation is a crucial part of grazing stalks and amounts may need to be adjusted depending on your herd. 

Utilizing corn stalks is a very effective forage source but to be successful, must be done correctly to meet the cow’s needs. Please reach out to one of our Livestock Advisors for more information and for any questions you may have! We are here to help your operation have a successful corn stalk grazing experience!

Carly Steffensmeier

Livestock Feed Advisor

Cell: (402)380-8781